Information Overload?

We live in a world where knowledge is at our fingertips. If you have a question – ask Google. What did we do before Google?

For me, as a child in the 1950’s and 60’s, my teacher was my ‘Google’. It was the teacher who had the knowledge and we went to school to learn from them. My access to knowledge at home was limited to a very cheap children’s encyclopaedia, which soon became out of date.

The role of the teacher today needs to change – they are no longer the ‘wise guardians of knowledge’. Information today is easily accessible through a myriad of technological devices.

Teachers today have to be guides, showing children where the information they want can be found, but more importantly how they can navigate their way through the wealth of information out there to ensure relevance and accuracy.

It is time to rethink the role of the teacher in the classroom and this will inevitably make us re-think the role of learning.

Have a look at this free e-book on critical thinking. The following is taken from the introduction:

In 1605, Sir Francis Bacon, the father of scientific thinking, outlined the habits of minds skilled in research:

  • Nimble & versatile to see relationships among things, in addition to subtle distinctions between them.
  • Inquisitive.
  • Patient enough to doubt and ask questions.
  • Fond of reflecting.
  • Slow to assert and ready to consider multiple points of view.
  • Careful to support their points of view and to formulate an argument with reasons and evidence.
  • A slave neither to passing trends nor to established traditions but capable of judging  the credibility of sources and making independent judgements about information.
  • Alert to all deception.

These ‘habits of mind’ are as essential now as they were in 1605.